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News Features (2014-Present)

International Workshop on gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail Structure and Function

2018 HIV DRP Think Tank Meeting

Sixth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

HIV DRP Conference on "Innate Immunity: Sensing, Signaling, and Selection"

Vinay Pathak Served as Co-Organizer of 2017 Retroviruses Meeting

Keynote Lectures by Stephen Hughes and Alan Rein at Retroviruses Meeting

Stephen Hughes Received 2017 Distinguished Research Career Award from The Ohio State University Center for Retrovirus Research

Fifth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

Stephen Hughes, Frank Maldarelli, and Mary Kearney Received 2016 Center for Cancer Research Group Award

Stephen Hughes Featured in CCR Connections Article

Fourth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

Eric Freed Appointed as Director of HIV DRP

Abdul Waheed Appointed as Lead Guest Editor for Special Issues of Molecular Biology International and Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Alan Rein Elected to American Academy of Microbiology

Eric Freed Appointed as Deputy Director of HIV DRP

Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award


Click here for News Features (2004-2013)



International Workshop on gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail Structure and Function

link to website for 2018 International Workshop on gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail Structure and Function - external


The HIV DRP hosted the inaugural International Workshop on gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail Structure and Function on April 26-27, 2018, at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick. This workshop highlights the important role of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail in Env trafficking, conformation, structure, virion incorporation, and viral infection.

The HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein complex is a heterotrimer comprising 3 molecules each of the surface glycoprotein gp120 and the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. The Env complex is essential for virus entry into the target cell, as it binds receptor and coreceptor and mediates the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Lentiviruses are unique among retroviruses in having transmembrane glycoproteins with very long cytoplasmic tails (approximately 150 amino acids in the case of HIV-1).

The structure and function of gp120 and the ectodomain of gp41 are relatively well understood. In contrast, although it is well established that the long gp41 cytoplasmic talk plays crucial roles in Env trafficking, internalization, incorporation into virions, ectodomain conformation, and immune detection, the structure and function of the cytoplasmic tail remain enigmatic. The International Workshop on gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail Structure and Function brings together groups working on this important biological problem for informal short talks and discussion.


group photo of speakers at 2018 International Workshop on gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail Structure and Function



[Click on the photo for a larger view]

 

Agenda


April 26, 2018


Eric Freed (HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, National Cancer Institute)
Welcome and introduction


Host Factors, Conformation and Function — Marc Johnson, Moderator


Paul Spearman (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center)
Role of Rab11-FIP1C in CT-dependent Env trafficking and particle incorporation


Melissa Fernandez (HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, National Cancer Institute)
Role of host cell machinery in Env incorporation


Markus Thali (University of Vermont)
EnvCT's contributions to the regulation of HIV-induced cell-cell fusion


Benjamin Chen (Harvard University)
Role of Env cytoplasmic tail antibody immune evasion


Akira Ono (University of Michigan Medical School)
Incorporation of cellular transmembrane proteins into HIV-1 particles


Structure — Clare Jolly, Moderator


Chris Aiken (Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
HIV-1 gp41-Gag interactions and their functional consequences


Jamil Saad (University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Towards elucidating the structural basis for HIV-1 envelope incorporation


Walther Mothes (Yale University)
Conformational dynamics of the HIV-1 Env protein


Kashif Sadiq (Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies)
Elucidating the role of the HIV-1 gp41 cytoplasmic tail from multiscale modeling


Bing Chen (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)
Structure of the membrane-interacting domains of HIV-1 Env spike


Sengupta Pradbuddha (Howard Hughes Medical Institute)
Mechanisms of selective protein packaging into viral membrane


Joseph Sodroski (Harvard University)
Effects of cleavage and the cytoplasmic tail on HIV-1 Env conformation


Eric Barklis (Oregon Health & Science University)
In vitro analysis of HIV-1 MA-CT interactions


April 27, 2018


Env Trafficking and Incorporation — Melissa Fernandez, Moderator


Schuyler van Engelenburg (Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
Single trimer fate of HIV-1 envelope during virus assembly


Jim Hoxie (University of Pennsylvania)
From molecules to monkeys and back, Part I: New insights into in vivo functions of the SIV envelope cytoplasmic tail


Mark Marsh (MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, University College London)
From molecules to monkeys and back, Part II: Cell biological insights into in vivo functions of the SIV envelope cytoplasmic tail


Tom Flower (University of California Berkeley)
Development of a giant unilamellar vesicle-based system for the study of HIV-gp41CT interactions in vitro


Nathan Sherer (University of Wisconsin)
Evolutionary conservation of retroviral matrix-envelope functional interactions


Clare Jolly (University College London)
How is Env trafficked to the virological synapse?


Klaus Strebel (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)
Expanding the functional repertoire of the HIV Env protein


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2018 HIV DRP Think Tank Meeting

Think Tank participantsThe HIV DRP hosted the 21st Annual Think Tank Meeting on March 28, 2018, at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick. Covering topics related to HIV, AIDS, and retrovirus biology, this event brings together investigators from NCI, NIH, other government agencies, and academic institutions in the mid-Atlantic region for a stimulating day of short presentations and discussion. Since its inception in 1998, the HIV DRP Think Tank Meeting has been very successful at fostering collaborations among these intramural and extramural investigators in the retrovirology community.

[Click on the images for a larger view]

Think Tank participants The HIV DRP provided 2018 Think Tank Travel Awards (two $1000 travel stipends) to Rachel Van Duyne (Freed lab) and Elizabeth Anderson (Maldarelli lab), whose presentations were judged by an eight-member panel as the two most meritorious talks by NCI fellows. Mauricio Comas-Garcia (Rein lab) and Rachel Van Duyne (Freed lab) were awardees in 2017; Mariia Novikova (Freed lab) and Mauricio Comas-Garcia (Rein lab), in 2016; and Yang Liu (Hu lab) and Emiko Urano (Freed lab), in 2015. In previous years, awardees of the HIV DRP Think Tank Travel Awards (provided by the Center of Excellence in HIV/AIDS and Cancer Virology, Center for Cancer Research, NCI) included Joanna Sztuba-Solinska (Le Grice lab) and Francesco Simonetti (Maldarelli lab), 2014; Joanna Sztuba-Solinska (Le Grice lab) and Chris Case (KewalRamani lab), 2013; Hyun Hu (KewalRamani lab) and Weizao Chen (Dimitrov lab), 2012; Kayoko Waki (Freed lab) and Cristina Bergamaschi (Pavlakis lab), 2011; and Muthukumar Balasubramaniam (Freed lab) and Michal Legiewicz (Le Grice lab), 2010.


2018 HIV DRP Think Tank Program:

John Coffin Introduction

Kazi Rahman

A functional genomics approach to reconstruct retrogene evolution


Jonathan Rawson

Recombination is required for efficient HIV-1 replication


Steve Smith

Compounds that are broadly effective against HIV-1 INSTI-resistant mutants


Zelia Worman

The role of LEDGF in mRNA splicing, transcription, and HIV-1 integration


Alan Rein

Efficient nucleation of particle assembly by the HIV-1 packaging signal


Huaying Zhao

Cooperativity in the interactions of HIV-1 Gag protein with nucleic acid


Prabuddha Sengupta

Protein sorting into HIV viral membranes is controlled by lipid phase separation and membrane curvature


Atanu Maiti

Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of HIV-1 restriction factor APOBEC3G in complex with ssDNA


Belete Desimmie

HIV-2 and HIV-1 Vif induce degradation of APOBC3G by utilizing different host protein degradation pathways


Rachel Van Duyne

Identification of HIV-1 Env mutations that confer broad resistance to antiretrovirals


Elizabeth Anderson

Accumulation and persistence of deleted HIV proviruses following prolonged cART


Yuntao Wu

Durable control of viral rebound in rhesus macaques by Rev-dependent lentiviral vectors


Valerie Boltz

Rare HIV plasma variants with linked dual-class resistance mutations are associated with combination antiretroviral therapy failure


Adam Longwich

Effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplant with continuous optimized ART on the HIV-1 reservoir


Camille Lange

HIV compartmentalization during opportunistic infection with cryptococcal meningitis


John Coffin

Closing remarks


[Top of page]


Sixth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

The Sixth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 14, 2017, at the National Cancer Institute campus in Frederick, Maryland, to honor David Derse's outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Dr. Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.  The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation is sponsored by the HIV DRP, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, the National Cancer Institute, the Foundation for NIH, and colleagues and friends of Dr. Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

Reuben S. Harris, Ph.D. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of Minnesota) delivered the sixth lecture in this annual series.  The title of his presentation was "Viruses, APOBECs, and Human Diseases."

Stephen Hughes, Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, and Eric Freed with Reuben Harris as he accepts Sixth Annual David Derse Memorial Award

Sixth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award
Reuben Harris, Stephen Hughes, Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, and Eric Freed (left to right)

Photo courtesy of Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Dr. Harris is a Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, the Associate Director of the Institute for Molecular Virology, and a Member of the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota.  He received his B.S. (1993) and Ph.D. (1997) degrees from the University of Alberta and performed postdoctoral work at Baylor College of Medicine (1997-1998), Yale University (1998), and Cambridge University (1998-2003).  He joined the University of Minnesota as an Assistant Professor in 2003 and was promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure in 2008 and to Full Professor in 2013.  Dr. Harris has received numerous grants and awards, including a Searle Scholarship, membership to the American Academy of Microbiology, and a Distinguished McKnight University Professorship.  In 2015, he was also appointed as an Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.  Dr. Harris is an Associate Editor for Science Advances and an Editorial Board Member for Journal of Biological Chemistry, Journal of Virology, and Cancer Research.  He has published nearly 150 manuscripts, contributed to 13 patent applications, and co-founded a cancer therapeutics company.

Dr. Harris’s scientific passion is elucidating mechanisms of mutation and establishing relevance to human biology and disease.  As a doctoral student, he discovered a novel recombination-dependent mutation process operative in stationary-phase bacteria with implications for antibiotic resistance and microbial evolution.  As a postdoctoral fellow, he helped solve an immunology Rosetta stone by discovering the DNA cytosine deaminase activity of AID and proposing a DNA deamination model for antibody gene diversification.  Also as a postdoctoral fellow, he discovered the DNA cytosine deaminase activity of several APOBEC family members and, during the transition to faculty, elucidated a new mechanism of antiviral immunity by demonstrating APOBEC3G-catalyzed retroviral cDNA hypermutation.  As a Principal Investigator, Dr. Harris has become known for his work on APOBEC enzymes in antiviral immunity, including discovering multiple APOBEC3s in HIV-1 restriction, demonstrating the mechanism by which HIV-1 Vif degrades APOBEC3 proteins, and elucidating the first structures of APOBEC-ssDNA complexes.  This body of work has shed light on fundamental mechanisms of antiviral immunity and yielded new strategies for drug development.

In recent years, Dr. Harris’s virology studies have enabled a major breakthrough in cancer research.  His group found that APOBEC3B and APOBEC3H are responsible for a large proportion of mutations in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and other cancers. Independent work has confirmed these results and indicated that "APOBEC mutagenesis" far exceeds most other sources of mutations in cancer, including those attributable to smoking and UV rays.  This breakthrough has created new opportunities for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment.  Please see http://harris.cbs.umn.edu for more information on Dr. Harris’s research program.

A live-captioned videocast of the lecture and award presentation was available on the NIH Videocasting website.  This videocast will also be archived at the same site; to view the videocast, click here.

Sixth Annual Derse Lecture and Award flyer for website



[Top of page]


HIV DRP Conference on "Innate Immunity: Sensing, Signaling, and Selection"

The HIV DRP Conference on "Innate Immunity: Sensing, Signaling, and Selection" was held on October 18, 2017, at the National Cancer Institute campus in Frederick, Maryland.  The HIV DRP hosted this half-day conference to showcase the latest findings in the broad field of innate immunity.  The presentations highlighted recent advances in understanding cell-intrinsic immune strategies by which hosts counteract viral and bacterial infections and the mechanisms by which pathogens circumvent or overcome these immune barriers.  Specific areas of focus included immune sensing, mutational escape, paleovirology, interferon-induced effector specificity, inflammasomes, and evolutionary conflicts between pathogens and host restriction factors.  An in-depth discussion of recent progress in our understanding host-pathogen interactions within infected cells should lead to new insights into the roles that cellular factors play in preventing infections in uninfected cells, which will aid in the international public health efforts.

Invited speakers in the outstanding program included Paul Bieniasz (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University), Alex Compton (HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, National Cancer Institute), Carolyn Coyne (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine), David Knipe (Harvard Medical School), Harmit Malik (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center), and Nan Yan (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center).  For additional information about the conference, click here.

An archived live-captioned videocast of the conference is available on the NIH Videocasting website; to view the videocast, click here.

In previous years, the HIV DRP Conference showcased other topics on the discovery, development, and delivery of antiviral and immunologic approaches for the prevention and treatment of viral infection, including Emerging Viruses: Origins, Biology, and Control of Transmission; Approaches to a Functional Cure for HIV Infection; Virus Structure: Putting the Pieces Together; Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection; and Trafficking of Viral Macromolecules.


Vinay Pathak Served as Co-Organizer of 2017 Retroviruses Meeting

Vinay Pathak co-organized the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Retroviruses Meeting in 2017. This annual meeting is the preeminent international conference highlighting the latest advances in retrovirology.


Keynote Lectures by Stephen Hughes and Alan Rein at Retroviruses Meeting

Keynote lectures by Stephen Hughes ("Why Study Integration and Reverse Transcription?") and Alan Rein ("Retroviruses: Some Perspectives") at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Retroviruses Meeting in 2017 and 2016, respectively, are featured on The Leading Strand, a new website spotlighting the keynote presentations at CSHL meetings.  These lectures are also publicly available through YouTube and Apple's iTunes University.


Stephen Hughes Received 2017 Distinguished Research Career Award from The Ohio State University Center for Retrovirus Research

Stephen Hughes was selected by the Center for Retrovirus Research of The Ohio State University to receive the 2017 Distinguished Research Career Award.  This annual award honors the distinguished research career of a scientist working in the field of retrovirology.  The retrovirologist is nominated by student and faculty members of the Center for Retrovirus Research and as part of the award recognition is invited to give a special lecture to all members of the Ohio State University biomedical research community.

Hughes receives Lifetime Achievement Award from OSU Center for Retrovirus Research

Stephen Hughes receives Career Award crystal from members of the Center for Retrovirus Research. Shown from left are Center for Retrovirus Research Director Patrick Green, Stephen Hughes, and Li Wu.

Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University Center for Retrovirus Research

Fifth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

The Fifth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 9, 2016, at the National Cancer Institute campus in Frederick, Maryland, to honor David Derse's outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Dr. Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.  The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV DRP, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, the National Cancer Institute, the Foundation for NIH, and colleagues and friends of Dr. Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

Michael H. Malim, D.Phil. (Department of Infectious Diseases, King's College London) delivered the fifth lecture in this annual series.  The title of his presentation was "Replication Deficiencies Pinpoint HIV-Host Interactions."

Fifth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

Fifth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award
Eric Freed, Michael Malim, Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, and Stephen Hughes (left to right)

Photo courtesy of Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Dr. Malim received his D.Phil. in Biochemistry from Oxford University in 1987, and started working on HIV/AIDS later that year as a postdoctoral fellow at Duke University in North Carolina.  In 1992 he joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, and after nine years in Philadelphia, returned to his native U.K. to establish the Department of Infectious Diseases at King’s College London.  Dr. Malim still holds this position, and is also Head of the Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Disease, as well as Director of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Doctoral Training Partnership in Biomedical Sciences.  He has served on many grant and fellowship review panels, including at NIH, amfAR, MRC, and the Wellcome Trust.  He is currently a Section Editor for the Open Access journal PLoS Pathogens, and an Editor for Virology.

Dr. Malim’s laboratory utilizes molecular genetic, cultured cell, biochemical, structural, bioinformatic, and cohort-based methodologies to study the biological principles that underpin HIV replication and pathogenesis (AIDS).  Over the course of the last 25 years, one fruitful approach that his group has employed has been to study "context-dependent" deficiencies in virus replication.  These may be recognized through the analysis of viral mutants/variants, cell-type or species-specific effects, and altered cell culture conditions, and, simplistically, can be attributable to the absence of cellular dependency factors that promote replication, or the expression of natural inhibitors or suppressors.  With this in mind, Dr. Malim and his colleagues discovered APOBEC3G as a cell-encoded inhibitor of HIV infection that is encapsidated into viral particles and acts through the combined effects of viral cDNA (cytidine-to-uridine) hypermutation and the suppression of reverse transcription, and they identified MX2 (MXB) as a cellular, interferon-inducible, capsid-specific suppressor of HIV nuclear import.  Importantly, the HIV-encoded Vif protein mediates evasion from APOBEC3G, whereas there is no apparent escape pathway from MX2.  In contrast, interspecies comparisons of HIV particle assembly have highlighted key points of regulation, and ongoing proteomic-based experiments are identifying novel cellular proteins that promote this key late step of the virus life cycle.  For more information about Dr. Malim and his research program, see https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/michael.malim.html.

A captioned videocast of the lecture and award presentation has been archived on the NIH Videocasting website; to view the videocast, click here.


[Top of page]

Stephen Hughes, Frank Maldarelli, and Mary Kearney Received 2016 Center for Cancer Research Group Award

Stephen Hughes, Frank Maldarelli, and Mary Kearney received a Center for Cancer Research Group Award in September 2016 for their recent work demonstrating that clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1. This work contributes in important ways to our understanding of the HIV reservoir in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy and is transformative both in terms of our basic understanding of HIV latency and in terms of efforts to devise strategies that might be able to cure HIV infection.


Stephen Hughes Featured in CCR Connections Article

Stephen Hughes was featured in a recent issue of the Center for Cancer Research publication CCR Connections.

[The following excerpt is from the article "Viral Activity," published 14 December 2015 in CCR Connections, Volume 9, No. 2.]

In the last four decades, HIV has gone from being an unknown killer to the cause of a manageable chronic disease.  Stephen Hughes, Ph.D., Chief of CCR’s Retroviral Replication Laboratory, began his study of retroviruses before HIV was identified, but quickly made the virus the main focus of his research career.  Hughes is internationally recognized for his work on two of the three essential enzymes in the HIV life cycle: reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN).  His work has shed light on the emergence of drug resistance and, more recently, the nature of reservoirs of HIV that persist despite combination antiretroviral therapy.  He has also used engineered host proteins that redirect HIV integration as tools for understanding eukaryotic chromatin organization.  [More]


Fourth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

The Fourth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 17, 2015, at the National Cancer Institute campus in Frederick, Maryland, to honor David Derse's outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Dr. Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.  The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV DRP, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, the National Cancer Institute, the Foundation for NIH, and colleagues and friends of Dr. Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

Quentin J. Sattentau, Ph.D. (The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford) delivered the fourth lecture in this annual series.  The title of his presentation was "Multiplicity and Mechanism in HIV Cell-Cell Spread."

Fourth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

Fourth Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award
Stephen Hughes, Quentin Sattentau, Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, and Eric Freed (left to right)

Photo courtesy of Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Dr. Sattentau obtained his B.Sc. in microbiology from the University of Bristol (1980) and his Ph.D. in virology and immunology of HSV-1 from the University of London (1985).  Postdoctoral studies on the interaction of HIV-1 with CD4 were done with Peter Beverley at University College London and in Richard Axel’s HHMI lab at Columbia University.  In 1992 Dr. Sattentau took up a tenured post as CNRS Director of Research at the Centre d’Immunologie in Marseille, France, where he worked on HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein structure, function, and interaction with neutralizing antibodies.  He returned to the U.K. in 1999 as Senior Lecturer at Imperial College.  In 2003 he joined the University of Oxford, where he is Professor of Immunology at The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology and tutorial fellow at Magdalen College Oxford.  He is the Virology section editor of F1000Prime, editorial board member of a number of journals, and grant reviewer for multiple funding bodies, including the NIH, and he serves on various committees and scientific advisory boards.  His recent research is mainly based around two broad areas: investigating the mechanisms by which HIV-1 spreads cell-to-cell, and designing strategies to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaccination.  At the University of Oxford he teaches courses on infection and immunity to biomedical science students and chairs the third-year medicine course.  He lives in Oxford on a frequently flooded island on the river Thames with his (more famous) scientist wife and three children.

Dr. Sattentau has worked for 30 years on two major research topics: understanding HIV-1–receptor interactions and mechanisms of viral spread, and investigating HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein function and neutralizing antibody mechanism and induction. Notable past contributions include mapping regions of CD4 interactive with HIV-1 gp120, characterizing receptor-activated conformational changes in the viral envelope glycoproteins required for fusion, and defining the intact HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer as the essential target of neutralizing antibodies.  His lab was the first to describe the HIV-1–T cell virological synapse and its function in 2004, and subsequently characterized essential elements of the cell biology and virology of this mode of spread and its inhibition.  In 2008 his lab reported on the macrophage–T cell virological synapse and showed that macrophages efficiently transfer virus to T cells via transient adhesive contacts.  A more recent (2014) discovery revealed that macrophages selectively capture HIV-1–infected dying T cells and in doing so become efficiently infected themselves by a diversity of viruses, including founder viruses.  These findings have implications for the spread and formation of HIV-1 reservoirs in vivo, for evasion of antiretroviral therapy and neutralizing antibody attack, and for pathogenesis, including the induction of harmful inflammation in immune tissues and the brain.  His lab, which currently consists of five members, uses cross-disciplinary techniques to address these research questions, including molecular and cellular immunology and virology and advanced imaging.  For more information about Dr. Sattentau and his research program, see http://users.path.ox.ac.uk/~qsattentau/index.htm.

A captioned videocast of the lecture and award presentation has been archived on the NIH Videocasting website; to view the videocast, click here.


Eric Freed Appointed as Director of HIV DRP

In 2015 Eric Freed was appointed as the Director of the HIV DRP. His new position was announced by Lee Helman [Acting Director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and Scientific Director for Clinical Research, CCR] and Glenn Merlino (Acting Scientific Director for Basic Research, CCR). In their August 2015 announcement, Drs. Helman and Merlino also expressed their thanks to Stephen Hughes, former Director of the HIV DRP, for his dedication and outstanding leadership of the Program since 2005. Dr. Hughes will remain Chief of the Retroviral Replication Laboratory and Acting Chief of the Host-Virus Interaction Branch.


Abdul Waheed Appointed as Lead Guest Editor for Special Issues of Molecular Biology International and Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Abdul Waheed was appointed as the Lead Guest Editor in 2012 for a special issue of Molecular Biology International on Host-Pathogen Interactions of Retroviruses, and in 2014 for a special issue of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry on Current and Emerging Drug Targets for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.


Alan Rein Elected to American Academy of Microbiology

Alan Rein was elected to the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM) in 2014. AAM Fellows are recognized as distinguished scientists who are "elected through a highly selective, annual, peer review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology....Each elected Fellow has built an exemplary career in basic and applied research, teaching, clinical and public health, industry or government service."


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Eric Freed Appointed as Deputy Director of HIV DRP

In 2014 Eric Freed was appointed as the Deputy Director of the HIV DRP. Robert Wiltrout, Director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research, announced Dr. Freed's new appointment as Deputy Director of the HIV DRP, citing his important role in the research, mentorship, and outreach activities of the HIV DRP since he joined the Program in 2003. Further details of Dr. Wiltrout's announcement are featured in the NCI at Frederick Poster newsletter.

Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

The Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 18, 2014, at the National Cancer Institute campus in Frederick, Maryland, to honor David Derse's outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Dr. Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.  The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV DRP, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, the National Cancer Institute, the Foundation for NIH, and colleagues and friends of Dr. Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

Walther Mothes, Ph.D. (Yale University School of Medicine) delivered the third lecture in this annual series.  The title of his presentation was "Seeing Is Believing – Visualizing Individual Steps of the Retroviral Life Cycle."

Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award

Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award
Stephen Hughes, Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, and Walther Mothes (left to right)

Photo courtesy of Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Dr. Mothes studied chemistry (Diploma 1993) and received a Ph.D. in cell biology (Humboldt University Berlin 1998) for his studies on protein secretion and membrane protein integration at the endoplasmic reticulum under the mentorship of Tom Rapoport at Harvard Medical School.  As a Jane Coffin Childs Fellow for Medical Research, Dr. Mothes completed his postdoctoral training on retroviral entry with John Young and James Cunningham before he started his own laboratory at Yale University in 2001.  He was awarded a Hellman Family Fellowship in 2002, and a Searle Scholarship in 2003.  Dr. Mothes was promoted to Associate Professor in 2007 and received Tenure in 2011.

Dr. Mothes’s laboratory is interested in various aspects of viral spread and pathogenesis of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Retroviruses can efficiently spread from cell to cell through contact zones, called virological and infectious synapses. The Mothes lab has contributed to understanding this process by directly visualizing the formation of cell-cell contacts between infected and uninfected cells, the polarization of virus assembly toward cell-cell contact sites, and the active transfer of viral infection to neighboring cells. A major current interest of the laboratory is to monitor viral spread and aspects of retroviral pathogenesis directly in living animals using multi-photon laser scanning microscopy. The laboratory is also applying single-molecule imaging to understand how conformational events in the HIV-1 envelope protein lead to fusion between viral and cellular membranes. A detailed understanding of these processes will permit the rational design of vaccines and antiviral therapies that prevent virus spreading and the infection of new cells. For more information about Dr. Mothes and his research program, see http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/mothes/index.aspx.

A captioned videocast of the lecture and award presentation has been archived on the NIH Videocasting website; to view the videocast, click here.  The lecture and award presentation are also featured in a recent issue of The Poster newsletter (link to article).


Last modified: 30 April 2018

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